So long! Helka’s litter
Aug 08, 2012 – 11:17 AM | No Comment

We are proud to announce the birth of three little miracles (Galga, Gercse and Gemenc) on August 31 by Chankazz Helka and Galla-Hegyi Nótás! Read more on the page for our G litter!

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Home » Working pumis

Flyball

Submitted by on Apr 21, 2010 – 10:09 PMNo Comment
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Flyball provides an entertaining and active way to interact with one’s dog and other dog lovers in an environment that is fun and allows the dogs exercise and enjoyment. It is especially a great way to burn off the energy of dogs with a high drive to work, such as Border Collies and Terriers..and pumis of course!

Helka playing flyball
A great part of flyball’s popularity stems from the fact that it is one of the competition activities available to mixed-breed dogs, allowing rescued mutts and non pedigree dogs to shine alongside their purebred canine friends. Though herding dogs currently dominate the courses, many champion teams have mutts on them. Dogs earn titles and awards based on points earned by their team in racing.

Also, flyball is not limited to the size of the breed, as smaller dogs often compete with great success in mixed-breed teams (teams consisting of dogs of various sizes and breeds). Smaller dogs are often prized as the hurdle height is based on the height of the smallest dog in the team, commonly known as a “height dog”. Their only limitation is whether they can trigger the release pad, and small dogs often have to fully jump on it to do so.

Flyball is one of the non-hunting dog sports in which dogs and people work as a team. Many casual pet owners use their flyball time more as a way to relax and socialize with other dog owners than as a competition, and many champion flyball dogs are essentially pet dogs with a hobby, rather than dedicated sporting or working dogs.

In flyball which teams of dogs race against each other from a start/finish line, over a line of hurdles, to a box that releases a tennis ball to be caught when the dog presses the spring loaded pad, then back to their handlers while carrying the ball.

Helka playing flyballFlyball is run in teams of four dogs, as a relay. The course consists of four hurdles placed 10 feet (3 m) apart from each other, with the starting line six feet (1.8 m) from the first hurdle, and the flyball box 15 feet (4.5 m) after the last one, making for a 51-foot (15.5 m) length. The hurdle height is determined by the shoulder height of the smallest dog in the team. Under current North American Flyball Association (NAFA) rules this should be 5 inches (12.7 cm) below the withers height of the smallest dog, to a height of no less than 7 inches (20.3 cm) and no greater than 14 inches (40.6 cm). Each dog must return its ball all the way across the start line before the next dog crosses. Ideal running is nose-to-nose at the start line. The first team to have all four dogs cross the finish line error free wins the heat. Penalties are applied to teams if the ball is dropped or if the next relay dog is released early.

A little theory?lFlyball started as a dog sport in the late 1960′s and early 1970′s, in Southern California. Some dog trainers combined scent hurdle racing with the dogs bringing back tennis ball to the finish line. Then a tennis ball-launching apparatus was added and the first flyball box was born. Herbert Wagner is credited with making the first real flyball box, and he also demonstrated flyball on the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.

The first Flyball tournament was held in 1983 in the USA.

Flyball has now expanded into many countries including Australia, Canada and South Africa, and in Europe countries such as Belgium, Britain, Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, the Netherlands, Poland and Hungary also have National flyball tournaments and also hold joint annual European championships.

And here are some pumi flyball videos about Ménesvölgyi Prézli Mamusz:

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